Aug 22, 2019  
Rensselaer Catalog 2017-2018 
    
Rensselaer Catalog 2017-2018 [Archived Catalog]

Courses


 
  
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    ISYE 4250 - Facilities Design and Industrial Logistics


    An in-depth study of the major design issues in location and physical configuration of production and service facilities. The course emphasizes the use of mathematical models, computer modeling, and quantitative analysis as aids to the design process. Topics include plant layout and location, material handling, material flow analysis, and distribution systems. Major course concepts are developed through case studies and projects.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisites: ISYE 2210 or equivalent, ISYE 4140 or equivalent, and an introductory operations research course.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 4260 - Human Performance Modeling and Support


    This course introduces methods, tools, and technologies for describing human performance via various types of models, and supporting this performance via tools and advanced technologies. The course is hands-on, involving student projects that investigate human performance in challenging domains as well as direct engagement with technologies for decision support.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENGR 2600.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 4270 - Multidisciplinary Capstone Design


    A capstone design experience that engages students from biomedical, computer systems, electrical, industrial, materials, and mechanical engineering on teams in an open-ended engineering design problem in preparation for professional practice. With the guidance of a multidisciplinary team of faculty members and instructional support staff, students apply knowledge and skills from prior coursework. This is a communication-intensive course.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENGR 2050, senior standing.

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as ECSE 4900, MTLE 4920, and MANE 4260. Students cannot obtain credit for this course and ECSE 4900, MTLE 4920, MANE 4260.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 4280 - Decision Focused Systems Engineering


    The objective of this course is to introduce students to systems engineering, especially from a decision-focused perspective. System concepts, methodologies, models, and analysis are covered in relation to a system’s design, development, test, evaluation, and operation. Decisions concerning a system’s reliability, maintainability, usability, disposability, and affordability are systematically considered. A range of systems, including service systems, is also considered.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Pre-or corequisite: ENGR 2600.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 4290 - Discrete Event Simulation Modeling and Analysis


    Introduction to discrete-event simulation modeling and analysis techniques including; graphical simulation modeling approaches, animation techniques, modeling large-scale and complex systems, pseudo-random number and random variate generation, stochastic processes, input modeling (data collection, analysis, and fitting distribution), output analysis (initial bias and termination bias, variance reduction techniques), sensitivity analysis, design of experiments, interactive simulation-based decision-support systems.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisites: ISYE 4140 or equivalent and CSCI 1100 or CSCI 1010 or permission of instructor.

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
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    ISYE 4300 - Complex Systems Models for Industrial and Systems Engineering


    This course introduces simulation-based modeling methods for complex systems frequently encountered and used by industrial and systems engineers. Examples include production systems, queuing networks, communication systems, healthcare systems, supply chains, social networks, transportation systems, and financial markets. This course introduces techniques including discrete-event simulation and agent-based simulation for modeling and analyzing interdependent, interacting, and coupling variables, agents, components, and related subsystems.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: ISYE 4290.

    When Offered: Upon availability of instructor.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 4310 - Ethics of Modeling for Industrial and System Engineering


    This course introduces students to past, current, and future issues in the ethics of information technology, and encourages students to develop their own standpoint from which to address the diverse range of ethical challenges faced in the information age. During the course, students will learn about a wide range of ethical theories, and then will apply these theories to address ethical dilemmas in creating models for decision support using an educational computer simulation.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisites:  ENGR 2600 and CSCI 1010 or CSCI 1100 or permission of instructor.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 4320 - Theory of Production Scheduling


    Problems of scheduling several tasks over time. Topics include measures of performance, single machine sequencing, flowshop scheduling, the job shop problem, and priority dispatching. Integer programming, dynamic programming, and heuristic approaches to various problems are also presented.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: ISYE 4600.

    When Offered: Upon availability of instructor.



    Cross Listed: ISYE 6210. Students cannot get credit for both ISYE 4320 and ISYE 6210.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 4330 - Design of Experiments


    Methods of designing experiments so that statistical analysis of the resulting data will yield the maximum useful information. Testing of hypotheses; analysis of variance and covariance. Various designs, including the factorial and its modifications, incomplete blocks, Latin squares, and response surface designs are covered. Also discussed are optimality properties of design.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: ISYE 4140 or MATP 4600 and ISYE 4760 (MATP 4620) or permission of the intructor.

    When Offered: Upon availability of instructor.



    Cross Listed: ISYE 6020.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 4530 - Information Systems


    This course surveys information-systems technology for the management of enterprise information as a resource. Topics include elements of system design life cycle, database concepts, and decision support. Managerial and technical dimensions of information systems are blended in a framework for IS systems. Additional topics include telecommunications, artificial intelligence (including expert systems), and structured design. The implementation, operation, and maintenance of information systems are also discussed. Projects are required.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: CSCI 1190 or equivalent.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
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    ISYE 4600 - Operations Research Methods


    An introduction to commonly used methods of deterministic and stochastic operations research. Topics include linear programming, simplex algorithms, duality, linear networks, integer programming, dynamic programming, goa1 programming, location models, exact and heuristic solution procedures for integer and sequencing problems, queuing theory, Markov chains, multi-criteria decision making, and decision analysis. Students cannot get credit for both ISYE 4600 and ISYE 6610. This is a communication-intensive course.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisites: ENGR 2600 and MATH 1020.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
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    ISYE 4760 - Mathematical Statistics


    A course in the theory of statistics which will provide students with a basic foundation for more specialized statistical methodology courses. Topics include sampling and sampling distributions; point estimation including method of moments, maximum likelihood estimation, uniform minimum variance estimation and properties of the associated estimators; confidence intervals; hypothesis testing including uniformly most powerful, likelihood ratio approaches, chi-square tests for goodness-of-fit and independence. The course will conclude with an introduction to linear statistical models.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: MATP 4600 or equivalent calculus-based course.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as MATP 4620. Students cannot obtain credit for both this course and MATP 4620.

    Credit Hours: 4

  
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    ISYE 4810 - Computational Intelligence


    With ever-increasing computer power readily available, new engineering methods based on “soft computing” are emerging at a rapid rate. This course provides students a working knowledge in computational intelligence covering the basics of fuzzy logic, neural networks, genetic algorithms, simulated annealing, wavelet analysis, fractal structures, and chaotic time series analysis. Applications in control, optimization, data mining, fractal image compression, and time series analysis are illustrated with engineering case studies.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 4940 - Readings in ISYE


    Credit Hours: 1 to 6

  
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    ISYE 4960 - Topics in ISYE


    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 6010 - Applied Regression Analysis


    Emphasis is on empirical model building and evaluation for both multiple linear and nonlinear regression models. Topics specifically addressed are simultaneous estimation, diagnostics and remedial measures, selection procedures, locally weighted least squares classification variables, binary response variables, time series data, nonlinear estimation, software packages.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisites: ISYE 4140 or MATP 4600 and ISYE 4760 (MATP 4620) or permission of the instructor.

    When Offered: Upon sufficient demand.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 6020 - Design of Experiments


    Methods of designing experiments so that statistical analysis of the resulting data will yield the maximum useful information. Testing of hypotheses; analysis of variance and covariance. Various designs, including the factorial and its modifications, incomplete blocks, Latin squares, and response surface designs are covered. Also discussed are optimality properties of design.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisites: ISYE 4140 or MATP 4600 and ISYE 4760 (MATP 4620) or permission of the instructor.

    When Offered: Upon sufficient demand.



    Cross Listed: ISYE 4330.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 6100 - Time Series Analysis


    Study of time series data for both description and prediction. Main emphasis on the classical Box-Jenkins approach to model identification, estimation, and diagnosis. Includes an introduction to spectral analysis. Applications to real data series, including forecasting problems and empirical comparison of alternative approaches. Use of computer packages for time series analysis.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: ISYE 4760 (MATP 4620) or equivalent.

    When Offered: Upon sufficient demand.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 6180 - Knowledge Discovery with Data Mining


    Data mining is the computationally intelligent extraction of information from large databases. It is the process of automated presentation of patterns, rules, and functions from large data bases to make crucial business decisions. This course takes a multi-disciplinary approach to data mining and knowledge discovery involving statistics, rule and tree induction, neural networks, genetic algorithms, visualization and fuzzy logic. The course is project driven and puts a special emphasis on the use of computational intelligence for scientific data mining related to drug design and bioinformatics.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENGR 2600 or equivalent introductory course in statistics.

    When Offered: Upon sufficient demand.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 6190 - Introduction to Big Data Analytics


    Big Data Analytics is the automated process for finding interesting, actionable information from large amounts of data. This course emphasizes the evolution from machine learning to big data analytics. Topics include data-driven science and engineering, basic data mining, machine learning approaches for big data, artificial neural networks, time series analysis and deep learning. There is a special emphasis on the use of scriptable code for Big Data Analytics.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: An introductory statistics course.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 6210 - Theory of Production Scheduling


    Problems of scheduling several tasks over time. Topics include measures of performance, single machine sequencing, flowshop scheduling, the job shop problem, and priority dispatching. Integer programming, dynamic programming, and heuristic approaches to various problems are also presented.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites:  Prerequisite: introductory course in operations research.

     

    When Offered: Upon sufficient demand.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 6500 - Information and Decision Technologies for Industrial and Service Systems


    This course emphasizes topics related to information systems and decision making including information and decision systems in organizations, database systems, knowledge systems, system analysis and design, networks and telecommunications in information systems, information systems for service delivery.

    When Offered: Upon sufficient demand.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 6600 - Design of Manufacturing System Supply Chains


    Dynamics of manufacturing systems and supply chains, lean manufacturing, lead time reduction in manufacturing and service operations, advanced pull systems, concurrent design of products and supply chains, rapid new product introduction, remanufacturing and reverse supply chains, and integration of information technology in supply chain operations. Analysis of models and their application to design and planning problems in manufacturing as well as service systems is emphasized.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisites: ISYE 4140 (or equivalent) or permission of instructor.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 6610 - Systems Modeling in Decision Sciences


    Survey of decision science methodologies in the context of technical and economic decision problems. The course seeks to develop a conceptual understanding of these methods and basic implementation skills. Students will learn how to apply decision science methods from problem recognition and data development through problem formulation and computer solution.  Students cannot get credit for both ISYE 4600 and ISYE 6610.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: ISYE 4140 or permission of instructor.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 6620 - Discrete-Event Simulation


    A thorough development of a simulation language is stressed in order to progress through a series of increasingly sophisticated applications of computer simulation. Projects cover a wide range of topics: production systems, inventory, finance, transportation, and public systems. The course includes model development, statistical analysis of simulation input/output data, validation planning, and managing simulation projects.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: ISYE 4140 or equivalent.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 6760 - Combinatorial Optimization and Integer Programming


    Review of exact and heuristic methods for solving discrete problems, including the traveling salesman problem, the knapsack problem, packing and covering problems. Algorithm complexity and NP-completeness, cutting plane methods and polyhedral theory, branch and bound, simulated annealing, tabu search, Lagrangian duality.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: introductory course in operations research.

    When Offered: Spring term odd-numbered years.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as MATP 6620. Students cannot obtain credit for both this course and MATP 6620.

    Credit Hours: 4

  
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    ISYE 6770 - Linear Programming


    A unified development of linear systems and linear programming, polyhedral theory, the simplex method, interior point methods, decomposition methods for large scale linear programming problems, the ellipsoid method, column generation algorithms for stochastic programming and other problems. 

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: introductory course in operations research.

    When Offered: Spring term even-numbered years.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as MATP 6640. Students cannot obtain credit for both this course and MATP 6640.

    Credit Hours: 4

  
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    ISYE 6780 - Nonlinear Programming


    Convex sets and functions, optimality conditions in nonlinear programming, Lagrangian duality, quadratic programming algorithms for nonlinear programming including Newton’s method, quasi-Newton methods, conjugate gradient methods, together with proofs of convergence.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: MATH 4200 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as MATP 6600. Students cannot obtain credit for both this course and MATP 6600.

    Credit Hours: 4

  
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    ISYE 6820 - Queuing Systems and Applications


    A course on fundamentals of stochastic processes and queuing theory emphasizing applications. Poisson processes, renewal processes, Markov chains, general methods in the study of Markovian and non-Markovian systems, tandem queues, networks of queues, priority and bulk queues, computational methods and simulation. Focus of the course is the application of these tools in the performance evaluation and design of computer systems, communication networks, manufacturing systems, and service systems.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: ECSE 2500 or MATP 4600 or equivalent.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as ECSE 6820. Students cannot obtain credit for both this course and ECSE 6820.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 6840 - Modeling Large-Scale Systems


    Applications of operations research and systems analysis techniques to mathematical modeling of complex systems, especially large-scale public systems. Discussion of model-building approaches, emphasizing the role of creativity, rationality, and mathematics. Introduction of important quantitative techniques (e.g., geometrical probability, optimization theory, and stochastic processes) and their application to modeling emergency service systems, spatial distribution of public service facilities, congestion, land-use patterns, transportation systems, demographics, and energy.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisites: Introductory course in operations research and ECSE 2500 or equivalent; ECSE 6830 desirable.

    When Offered: Fall term even-numbered years.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as ECSE 6840. Students cannot obtain credit for both this course and ECSE 6840.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 6870 - Introduction to Neural Networks


    Neural networks are program and memory at once, useful where traditional techniques fail, i.e., for artificial speech and image recognition. Emphasis on existing and emerging engineering applications. Parallel distributed processing, Hebb’s rule, Hopfield net, back-propagation algorithm, perceptrons, unsupervised learning, Kohenen self-organizing map, genetic algorithms, neocognitron, adaline. Illustrated with computer programs and lectures.

    When Offered: Upon sufficient demand.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 6900 - Seminar in ISYE Research


    A review of active ISYE doctoral research projects and activities. Students develop a research paper or proposal under the guidance of a selected faculty adviser and present research findings in class. It is anticipated that the research paper will lead to identification of the broad area of dissertation research. The proposal should be of a quality that can be submitted to an external funding agency.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: ISYE doctoral student or permission of instructor.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 6940 - Readings in ISYE


    Credit Hours: 3 to 6

  
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    ISYE 6960 - Topics in ISYE


    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ISYE 6970 - Professional Project


    Active participation in a semester-long project, under the supervision of a faculty adviser. A Professional Project often serves as a culminating experience for a Professional Master’s program but, with departmental or school approval, can be used to fulfill other program requirements. With approval, students may register for more than one Professional Project. Professional Projects must result in documentation established by each department or school, but are not submitted to the Office of Graduate Education and are not archived in the library. Grades of A, B, C, or F are assigned by the faculty adviser at the end of the semester. If not completed on time, a formal Incomplete grade may be assigned by the faculty adviser, listing the work remaining to be completed and the time limit for completing this work.

    Credit Hours: 1 to 4

  
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    ISYE 6980 - Master’s Project


    Active participation in a master’s-level project under the supervision of a faculty adviser, leading to a master’s project report. Grades of IP are assigned until the master’s project has been approved by the faculty adviser. If recommended by the adviser, the master’s project may be accepted by the Office of Graduate Education to be archived in the Library. Grades will then be listed as S.

    Credit Hours: 1 to 9

  
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    ISYE 6990 - Master’s Thesis


    Active participation in research, under the supervision of a faculty adviser, leading to a master’s thesis. Grades of S or U are assigned by the adviser each term to reflect the student’s research progress for the given semester. Once the thesis has been presented, approved by the adviser, and accepted by the Office of Graduate Education, it will be archived in a standard format in the library.

    Credit Hours: 1 to 9

  
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    ISYE 9990 - Dissertation


    Active participation in research, under the supervision of a faculty adviser, leading to a doctoral dissertation. Grades of IP are assigned until the dissertation has been publicly defended, approved by the doctoral committee, and accepted by the Office of Graduate Education to be archived in a standard format in the library. Grades will then be listed as S.

    Credit Hours: Variable

  
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    ITWS 1100 - Introduction to Information Technology and Web Science


    This course introduces students to the field of information technology and Web science, the types of problems encountered in the field, and the solution approaches used to solve them. Through a series of activities and projects, students are introduced to topics such as Web systems design, emerging Web standards, database systems, security, and computer networking. Guest speakers highlight information technology practices in industry. Students work in groups on a team project and presentation at the end of the course.

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
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    ITWS 1220 - IT and Society


    Will IT increase prosperity? For whom? What role should governments play in IT development? Do corporations have new responsibilities in the Information Era? What about IT professionals? This course explores the issues, the arguments and working solutions. The first section examines macro indicators and trends. The second section examines the microeconomics and politics of specific arenas—the software industry, the automated work place, telemedicine, television. The last section explores opportunities for improving society, using IT. This is a communication-intensive course.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as IHSS 1220. Students cannot obtain credit for both this course and IHSS 1220.

    Credit Hours: 4

  
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    ITWS 2110 - Web Systems Development


    This course involves a study of the methods used to extract and deliver dynamic information on the World Wide Web. The course uses a hands-on approach in which students actively develop Web-based software systems. Additional topics include installation, configuration, and management of Web servers. Students are required to have access to a PC on which they can install software such as a Web server and various programming environments.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisites:  ITWS 1100 and CSCI 1200.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
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    ITWS 2210 - Introduction to Human Computer Interaction


    An introduction to the current theories, methods, and issues in human-computer interaction. Theory and research along with practical application are discussed within the context of organizational impact. The course provides the knowledge of HCI systems and research used for the implementation of safe, quick, and useable interactive technologies.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
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    ITWS 4100 - Information Technology and Web Science Capstone


    Students work on collaborative projects to design innovative ITWS solutions which address a specific problem or area of need in the student’s field. Students work to identify a problem and research viable solutions. They go on to propose, design, and prototype their ITWS solution learning best practices for ITWS project management, communication, and user-center design, This course serves as the culminating experience for the undergraduate ITWS program. Restricted to ITWS majors. This is a communication-intensive course.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: ITWS 2210 and ITWS 4310.

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as ITWS 6800. Students cannot receive credit for both ITWS 4100 and ITWS 6800 during the same semester.

    Credit Hours: 4

  
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    ITWS 4300 - Business Issues for Engineers and Scientists


    Investigates business-related considerations in successfully commercializing new technology in a new venture or within an existing enterprise: market and customer analysis, beating the competition, planning and managing for profitability, high-tech marketing and sales, and business partnerships and acquisitions. Not a general management course; focuses explicitly on what is relevant for engineers and scientists working in a commercial environment. For junior/senior undergraduate or graduate students.

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as ENGR 4100/ENGR 6100 and ITWS 6300. Students can only obtain credit for one of these courses.

    Credit Hours: 4 credit hours undergraduate; 3 credit hours graduate

  
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    ITWS 4310 - Managing IT Resources


    This course provides an introduction to fundamental concepts of management and applies them to IT. It examines the use of IT in business processes and the management issues of integrating IT into organizational processes to gain competitive advantage. Topics include: management, organizations, and information systems; development life cycle; project management and systems engineering; process reengineering; and organizational learning. This course includes the planning, development, and implementation of an IT project for a real client.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: ITWS 2110 or permission of instructor.

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
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    ITWS 4350 - Data Science


    Data science is advancing the inductive conduct of science and is driven by the greater volumes, complexity and heterogeneity of data being made available over the Internet. It combines aspects of data management, library science, computer science, and physical science. It is changing the way all of these disciplines do both their individual and collaborative work. Key methodologies in application areas based on real research experience are taught.

     

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Data Structures (CSCI 1200), Database Systems (CSCI 4380) preferred.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as ITWS 6350, CSCI 4350/6350 and ERTH 4350/6350. Students can obtain credits for only one of these courses.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ITWS 4370 - Information System Security


    This course covers foundational models for information security, policies, authentication, access control, database security, assurance, auditing, and intrusion detection. It also devotes substantial time to secure coding practices. Students will be expected to complete projects that explore an aspect of information security in detail. Cryptography is not covered since it is a focus of other courses.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisites:  CSCI 2500 or ECSE 2660; and CSCI 1200. Experience with database systems recommended.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
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    ITWS 4400 - X-Informatics


    Informatics covers a broad range of disciplines addressing challenges in the explosion of data and information resources. X-informatics provides commonality for implementations in specific disciplines, e.g. X=astro, geo. Informatics’ theoretical bases are information and computer science, cognitive science, social science, library science, aggregating these studies and adding the practice of information processing, and the engineering of information systems. This course grounds the material that students will learn in discipline areas by coursework and project assignments. Note:  Students cannot obtain credit for both ITWS 4400 and ITWS 6400.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisites:  CSCI 1200 and Data Science (CSCI/ERTH/ITWS 4350/6350).

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as ITWS 6400, CSCI 4400/6400 and ERTH 4400/6400. Students can only obtain credit for one of these courses.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ITWS 4500 - Web Science Systems Development


    Building on the technology covered in Web Systems Development, students will be exposed to current technologies, frameworks, and practices in the area of Web development. Types of topics included will be HTML5/CSS3, API’s for data, Ruby on Rails, node.js, MongoDB, PHP, and RDF. Methodology to be explored will be application design, software versioning, and team development. Lab intensive, this course is intended to complete a foundation for the advanced courses in Data Science and Advanced Web Science. 

     

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite:  ITWS 2110 Web Systems Development.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
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    ITWS 4600 - Data Analytics


    The world at-large is confronted with increasingly larger and complex sets of structured/unstructured information; from cyber and human sources. Traditional enterprises are moving toward analytics-driven approaches for core business functions. Data and information analytics extends analysis (descriptive models of data) by using data mining and machine learning methods, with optimization and validation, to recommend action or guide and communicate decision-making. Thus, analytics is an entire methodology rather then individual analyses or analysis steps.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Data Science ITWS/CSCI/ERTH 4350/6350 or permission of instructor.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as ITWS 6600. Students can only obtain credit for one of these courses.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ITWS 4700 - Software Development


    This course teaches students about the roles and infrastructure of IT departments in modern organizations, IT software engineering technologies and methodologies for software development life cycle through hands-on experience. The course is for students with software development background to enhance their knowledge of software development and management, the software development industry, open source community, etc.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite:  Programming languages (Java, or C#, or C++, and Script, XML, SQL), concepts of OO and design patterns, and basics of IDE

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as ITWS 6700. Students can only obtain credit for one of these courses.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ITWS 4980 - Special Projects


    Active participation in a senior-level project supervised by a faculty member and requiring a presentation and project report. Grades of “in-progress” are assigned until the special project has been approved by the faculty member.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Permission of instructor.

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Credit Hours: 1-4

  
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    ITWS 4990 - Senior Thesis


    A two-semester spring-fall or fall-spring course dealing with an advanced level independent research project supervised by a faculty member and requiring the presentation of a thesis. First term registration is limited to second semester juniors and first semester seniors. The grade for the first semester will be listed as “in progress.”

     

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Permission of instructor.

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ITWS 6300 - Business Issues for Engineers and Scientists


    Investigates business-related considerations in successfully commercializing new technology in a new venture or within an existing enterprise: market and customer analysis, beating the competition, planning and managing for profitability, high-tech marketing and sales, and business partnerships and acquisitions. Not a general management course; focuses explicitly on what is relevant for engineers and scientists working in a commercial environment. For junior/senior undergraduate or graduate students.

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as ENGR 4100/ENGR 6100 and ITWS 4300. Students can only obtain credit for one of these courses.

    Credit Hours: 4 credit hours undergraduate; 3 credit hours graduate

  
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    ITWS 6350 - Data Science


    Data science is advancing the inductive conduct of science and is driven by the greater volumes, complexity and heterogeneity of data being made available over the Internet. It combines aspects of data management, library science, computer science, and physical science. It is changing the way all of these disciplines do both their individual and collaborative work. Key methodologies in application areas based on real research experience are taught.

     

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite:  Data Structures (CSCI 1200).  Database Systems (CSCI 4380) preferred.

    When Offered: Fall semester annually.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as ITWS 4350, CSCI 4350/6350 and ERTH 4350/6350. Students can obtain credits for only one of these courses.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ITWS 6400 - X-Informatics


    Informatics covers a broad range of disciplines addressing challenges in the explosion of data and information resources. X-informatics provides commonality for implementations in specific disciplines, e.g. X=astro, geo. Informatics’ theoretical bases are information and computer science, cognitive science, social science, library science, aggregating these studies and adding the practice of information processing, and the engineering of information systems. This course grounds the material that students will learn in discipline areas by coursework and project assignments. Note:  Students cannot obtain credit for both ITWS 4400 and ITWS 6400.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisites:  CSCI 1200 and Data Science (CSCI/ERTH/ITWS 4350/6350).

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as ITWS 4400, CSCI 4400/6400 and ERTH 4400/6400. Students can only obtain credit for one of these courses.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
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    ITWS 6600 - Data Analytics


    The world at-large is confronted with increasingly larger and complex sets of structured/unstructured information; from cyber and human sources. Traditional enterprises are moving toward analytics-driven approaches for core business functions. Data and information analytics extends analysis (descriptive models of data) by using data mining and machine learning methods, with optimization and validation, to recommend action or guide and communicate decision-making. Thus, analytics is an entire methodology rather then individual analyses or analysis steps

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Data Science ITWS/CSCI/ERTH 4350/6350 or permission of instructor.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as ITWS 4600. Students can only obtain credit for one of these courses.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    ITWS 6700 - Software Development


    This course teaches students about the roles and infrastructure of IT departments in modern organizations, IT software engineering technologies and methodologies for software development life cycle through hands-on experience. The course is for students with software development background to enhance their knowledge of software development and management, the software development industry, open source community, etc.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisites:  Programming languages (Java, or C#, or C++, and Script, XML, SQL), concepts of OO and design patterns, and basics of IDE.

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as ITWS 4700. Students can only obtain credit for one of these courses.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    ITWS 6800 - Information Technology Master’s Capstone


    Integration of the knowledge and professional practice of the Master’s in IT core and concentration courses. Topics in database systems, networking, software design, human computer interaction, management of technology, and ethics are applied within a framework of global e-business strategy. The course utilizes a Team Project with a real organization to practice major IT concepts. Team members select, develop, and present a significant technology implementation project, incorporating strategy, systems development, and business planning.

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Cross Listed: Cross listed as ITWS 4100. Students cannot receive credit for both ITWS 4100 and ITWS 6800 during the same semester.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    ITWS 6980 - Master’s Project


    Active participation in a master’s-level project under the supervision of a faculty adviser, leading to a master’s project report. Grades of IP are assigned until the master’s project has been approved by the faculty adviser and the Office of Graduate Education to then be archived in a standard format in the library. Grades will then be listed as S.

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Credit Hours: 3-4

  
  •  

    ITWS 6990 - Master’s Thesis


    Active participation in research, under the supervision of a faculty adviser, leading to a master’s thesis. Grades of S or U are assigned by the adviser each term to reflect the student’s research progress for the given semester. Once the thesis has been presented, approved by the adviser, and accepted by the Office of Graduate Education, it will be archived in a standard format in the library.

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Credit Hours: 3-6

  
  •  

    LANG 1410 - Chinese I


    This course assumes no previous knowledge of the subject. The course is designed to provide students with fundamental skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing Mandarin Chinese. Oral and aural skills will be emphasized. Background on Chinese culture will be introduced as an element of the course.  For entry level, non-native speakers only. 

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LANG 2410 - Chinese II


    This is a continuation of Chinese I, a course for the standard modern Chinese language (Mandarin). Students learn more Chinese characters and words, reach a total of nearly 500 characters and 650 words, and use more complicated grammatical structures, including some compliment phrases and topic-comment sentences. In sum, students will learn more in all four aspects—listening, speaking, reading, and writing—presented in Chinese I.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: LANG 1410 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LANG 2420 - Chinese III


    This is a continuation of Chinese II, a course for the standard modern Chinese language (Mandarin). Students learn more Chinese characters and words, reach a total of about 650 characters, 1000 words, and use more complicated grammatical structures, e.g., reduplication of adjectives and verbs, resultative and potential compliments. In sum, students learn more in all four aspects—listening, speaking, reading and writing—presented in Chinese II. This is a communication-intensive course.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: LANG 2410 or equivalent or permission of instructor. 

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LANG 2940 - Language Studies


    Readings and projects adapted to the needs of individual students.

    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LANG 4430 - Chinese IV


    This is a continuation of Chinese III, a course for standard modern Chinese language (Mandarin). Students learn additional Chinese characters and words, reach a total of about 800 characters, 1350 words, and complicated grammatical structures, e.g., expression of approximation, comparison of structural and aspect particles, etc. In sum, students learn more in all four aspects—listening, speaking, reading, and writing—presented in Chinese III.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: LANG 2420 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

    When Offered: Upon availability of instructor.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LANG 4470 - Chinese V


    Chinese V is a continuation of Chinese IV, a course for standard modern Chinese language (Mandarin). Students learn additional Chinese characters and words, reach a total of about 950 characters, 1700 words, and complicated grammatical structures, e.g., idiomatic expressions, expressions of comparison, concession, and subjection, etc. In sum, students learn more in all four aspects – listening, speaking, reading and writing – presented in Chinese IV.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: LANG 4430 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

    When Offered: Upon availability of instructor.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LANG 4940 - Language Studies


    Readings and projects adapted to the needs of individual students.

    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LANG 6940 - Language Studies


    Readings and projects adapted to the needs of individual students.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    LGHT 4230 - Lighting Design


    A design studio that explores the roles of light in architecture and its application by design. Students conceive, evaluate, and synthesize solutions that contribute to successful lighting and architectural design.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LGHT 4770 - Lighting Technologies and Applications


    This course provides students with an in-depth understanding of the components of advanced lighting systems and enables them to critically explore applications of those components. Through lectures, readings, assignments, and application projects, students acquire working knowledge of the relevant products and techniques for lighting application and develop solutions to lighting problems. Students will undertake practical applications of advanced lighting technologies and develop skills in the application of photometric data, use of manual and computer-based lighting calculations, and the development of lighting specifications.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LGHT 4840 - Human Factors in Lighting


    An introduction to lighting and human factors, including classical literature and contemporary studies and development of skills needed to conduct and evaluate human factors research.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    LGHT 4940 - Advanced Individual Projects in Lighting


    Individual projects and readings adapted to the needs of individual students at the advanced level.

    Credit Hours: 1 to 6

  
  •  

    LGHT 6750 - Lighting Research Design


    An introduction to the philosophy of research and different approaches to it. Emphasis is placed on planning, executing, analyzing, and describing experiments. Each student is required to keep a laboratory notebook and to perform statistical tests in concert with assigned research projects.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LGHT 6760 - Lighting Workshop


    The Lighting Workshop is a research and design studio integrating scholarship, technology, design, policy, and communication in an intensive, project specific context. The course includes a number of topics, selected each year by faculty. These topics are selected to emphasize scholarship; require a variety of written and verbal presentation techniques; increase synthesizing skills in design, applications, and visualization software; and require teamwork and individual efforts. The Lighting Workshop emphasizes studio and seminar work supplemented with lecture, class discussions, and individual and group research, design, writing, and reading assignments.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: LGHT 4230.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LGHT 6770 - Light and Health


    This course will explore the effects of light and lighting on people’s physical and psychological health and well-being. Lectures will focus on the physiology of the visual and circadian systems, the relationship between lighting and visual performance and circadian photobiology, including the relationship between lighting and Alzheimer’s disease, sleep disorder, alertness, seasonal affective disorder (SAD), and breast cancer. The course will conclude with a research project studying the interaction of light and human health in the built environment. Students will learn to apply their newly acquired knowledge of the health effects of light to lighting design and application.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: LGHT 4840.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LGHT 6780 - Lighting Leadership Seminar


    A series of topics and case studies to prepare students for leadership roles in the lighting industry. Topics relate to product innovation and factors influencing changes of policy and processes in the lighting industry and involve lecture and discussion sessions and reading assignments. Case studies examine selected topics in greater depth, using actual situations to illustrate interactions of technology and business forces.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LGHT 6830 - The Physics of Light


    A comprehensive overview of the physics of light and its applications for lighting. The course uses a variety of instructional methodologies, including lectures, laboratory sessions, hands-on experimentation, and individual student projects and presentations to cover various areas of lighting study. Topics include geometric optics, physical optics, lighting calculations and measures, spectroradiometry, measurement techniques for advanced light sources, radiometry, and photometry.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LGHT 6940 - Advanced Individual Projects in Lighting


    Individual projects and readings adapted to the needs of individual students at the advanced level.

    Credit Hours: 1 to 6

  
  •  

    LGHT 6980 - Master’s Project


    Active participation in a master’s-level project, under the supervision of a faculty adviser, leading to a master’s project report. The course is the culminating experience in the Master’s of Science in Architectural Sciences with a Concentration in Lighting and the Master’s of Science in Lighting. It is taught by faculty at the Lighting Research Center (LRC). The course allows students to work independently with a member of faculty to synthesize the information provided in formal course work by undertaking a master’s-level  project in lighting. Grades of IP are assigned until the master’s project has been approved by the faculty adviser. Grades will then be listed as S. If recommended by the adviser, the master’s project may be accepted by the Office of Graduate Education to be archived in the library.

    Credit Hours: 1-9

  
  •  

    LGHT 6990 - Master’s Thesis


    Active participation in research, under the supervision of a faculty adviser, leading to a master’s thesis. Grades of S or U are assigned by the adviser each term to reflect the student’s research progress for the given semester. Once the thesis has been presentend, approved by the adviser, and accepted by the Office of Graduate Education, it will be archived in a standard format in the library.

    Credit Hours: 1 to 9

  
  •  

    LITR 2110 - Introduction to Literature


    A study of major literary works that introduces students to basic ideas and terminology in literary criticism. Students learn to read and interpret a selection of novels, plays, poetry, or other forms of writing to be determined each semester by the instructor. This is a communication-intensive course.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LITR 2150 - Modern and Contemporary Literature


    Students explore the philosophical, political, and artistic grounds from which modern and contemporary literature arises and develop their own creative capacities in a project related to the course readings.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LITR 2420 - Art of the Film


    A survey of selected films whose directors have contributed to the resources of the medium, as well as a study of technical and aesthetic considerations that distinguish film from other arts. Reading assignments in film history, techniques, scripts, and special research projects.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LITR 2450 - Utopian Literature


    An exploration of the use of fiction to propagate ideas about ideal or nightmarish societies. This course examines the artistic techniques employed in this distinct tradition and the unusual interplay between fiction and reality that this popular genre represents. Students work toward the design of their own utopian scheme in short story or other form. This is a communication-intensive course.

    When Offered: Fall term odd-numbered years.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LITR 2770 - Women Writers


    Women Writers examines creative works of literature produced by women of different times, such as novels, poetry, performance art, and graphic novels. These diverse works explore issues of personal identity and social responsibility that are complicated by different historical attitudes towards matters of gender, race, and class. Discussion and viewing of film and visual art will complement the course’s focus on literature. This is a communication-intensive course.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LITR 2940 - Literature Studies


    Readings and projects adapted to the needs of individual students.

    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LITR 4150 - Science and Fiction


    An exploration of the ongoing dialogue between science/technology and literature through the reading of landmark works about science and fictional works that describe scientific ideas and methods. Topics include artificial intelligence, genetic engineering, and cyborgs. This is a communication-intensive course.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LITR 4210 - Humor, Comedy, and Satire


    Readings of literature from various periods in these three modes, including works by classical, renaissance, and contemporary writers. May include film, videos, and audio recordings.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: one literature course.

    When Offered: Upon availability of instructor.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LITR 4230 - Irish Literature


    A survey of major works by Irish authors writing in English, with a particular focus on the fiction and drama of the twentieth century. Authors will include: Oscar Wilde, Samuel Beckett, James Joyce, and W.B. Yeats. 

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Any LITR, WRIT, or COMM course or permission of instructor.

    When Offered: Upon availability of instructor.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LITR 4410 - Film Theory


    The purpose of this course is to study significant theories of representation that analyze the visual codifications generically called “film.” The course will examine theories of visual rhetoric and of narrativity; look at the way economic and technological factors have affected the construction of cinematic codes, styles, and trends; examine influential psychoanalytic theories and feminist theories; and consider the ways in which popular films participate in the cultural narratives specific to their moment of production.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: any film course or permission of instructor.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LITR 4960 - Topics in Literature


    Experimental courses tried out in one or two terms.

    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    LITR 6940 - Literature Studies


    Readings and projects adapted to the needs of individual students.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    LITR 6960 - Topics in Literature


    Experimental courses tried out in one or two terms.

    Credit Hours: 3

  
  •  

    MANE 1060 - Fundamentals of Flight


    A seminar based course providing an overview of the aerospace engineering field. Emerging and existing aerospace engineering technologies found in aircraft, rotorcraft, rockets, and spacecraft, and the engineering sciences relevant to aerospace engineering are introduced. This course is graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

     

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Credit Hours: 1

  
  •  

    MANE 1090 - Introduction to Mechatronics Hardware and Software


    A laboratory introduction to simulation and hardware programming with MATLAB and Simulink. Course covers: fundamental theory and programming tools for common sensors and actuators: gyroscopes, accelerometers, magnetometers, encoders, analog sensors, DC Motors, and motor drivers. Including: discretization, sampling, integration, differentiation, delays, saturation, and control. Material covered in a hands-on, observable, and application specific way. Weekly one-hour lab/lectures introduce basic topics. Labs reinforce covered topics and are performed at home with provided hardware kits.

    When Offered: Fall term annually, spring term on sufficient demand.



    Cross Listed: ECSE 1090; students cannot obtain credit for both this course and ECSE 1090.

    Credit Hours: 1

  
  •  

    MANE 1100 - Introduction to Nuclear Engineering


    A survey of concepts applied to nuclear power production and non-power application of nuclear science and technology. Topics include next generation nuclear power plants, nuclear reactor material, waste management, environmental impacts of nuclear power, fusion power, medical applications, radiation protection, and other topics of current interest. Introduction to and tours of experimental facilities including an electron accelerator and a low power nuclear fission reactor. Discussions of educational, research, and career opportunities in Nuclear Engineering. This course is graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Credit Hours: 1

  
  •  

    MANE 2220 - Inventor’s Studio 1


    A first course in enhancing critical skills for leaders of technological innovation. The course emphasizes creativity, teamwork, communication and work across engineering disciplines. Students learn how to build on personal and innate talents through critical thinking skills, design-oriented mindsets, and an understanding of appropriate tool and process selection. Students will utilize tools and processes for ideation and innovation, develop ideas from concepts to minimum viable products via the ideate - build - learn cycle, and recognize and understand prototyping methods.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: ENGR 1100 and ENGR 1200 or ENGR 1400. Corequisite: PHYS 1200.

    When Offered: Fall and spring terms annually.



    Cross Listed: The course meets with ENGR 1010.  Students cannot get credit for both ENGR 2050 and Inventors Studio 1.

    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    MANE 2400 - Fundamentals of Nuclear Engineering


    Nuclear reactor systems and types; basic reactor physics, criticality calculations; fuel cycles; reactivity changes; reactor kinetics. Instrumentation and control; radiation protection. Reactor materials; shielding; energy removal. Reactor safety; economics. Waste management. Reactor design.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: MANE 2830 or equivalent.

    When Offered: Fall term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

  
  •  

    MANE 2830 - Nuclear Phenomena for Engineering Applications


    A survey of atomic and nuclear phenomena and their application in various engineering disciplines. Systematics of atoms and nuclei; nuclear reactions and their characterization; radioactive decay; fission and fusion energy release; radiation effects on materials and biological systems; radiation production, detection, and protection. Applications in energy production, manufacturing, medicine, etc.

    Prerequisites/Corequisites: Prerequisite: PHYS 1100 and CHEM 1100.

    When Offered: Spring term annually.



    Credit Hours: 4

 

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